TESOL Teacher Review: The Rewards of Living and Teaching English in Taiwan

Teach English in Taiwan

When I was in university, it always interested me to travel and teach abroad. After university I travelled throughout Asia and met many people teaching there. They absolutely loved it and recommended it, so I decided to pursue teaching English.

The benefits of living in another country are countless. In many of these countries, you have the ability to live very comfortably and save a lot of money. In turn, you live and experience a totally different culture and way of life!

Tim Sharp is a graduate of OnTESOL’s 140-hour TESOL certificate course. He is currently teaching English with his partner, Taylor, in Taiwan. 

Adjusting To A New Way Of Life

The biggest challenge for me so far has been adjusting to the different way of life. It can be a little overwhelming at the beginning. The start up costs can be quite expensive as well. I would recommend saving a little before moving here. However, after a couple months , it becomes to get easier and easier to adjust.

Living Your Best Life In Taiwan

Teaching English abroad in TaiwanI chose to teach in Taiwan for many reasons. The people here are some of the friendliest in the world. The cost of living in combination with the great salary was also a big motivating factor.

The standard of living is quite high for foreigners. My  girlfriend and I live on the 20th floor of a high rise with a swimming pool for around $800 Canadian a month in the central business district of a major city. This would cost nearly 2-3 times more in a city like Vancouver or Toronto. An average meal at a Taiwanese restaurant may cost you 2-3 dollars Canadian.

Easing Into Teaching English

One of biggest lessons I’ve learned is to be patient with students and teachers. As an English teacher you need to be patient with students and with your co-workers. Being lost in translation in Taiwan is a very common thing. The OnTESOL certificate helped to gain the confidence needed to teach in Asia. The training period would have been a lot more daunting had we not taken the OnTESOL course. It helped us ease into the teaching process a lot easier.

Register now and save $200 on any of our specialist courses!

Tips For Preparing To Teach English In Taiwan

We decided to move to Taiwan first to research several different schools. When we arrived, we met a few other foreigners who recommended the school we’re currently at. We looked into the school and liked what we saw in terms of reviews and the pay. The hours at our school are also guaranteed which is important look for in Buxibans (after-school centres) in Taiwan.

The biggest concern for us was not having a job lined up before we came. We had read online that this was the best way to go about the process and I couldn’t recommend it more. Accepting a job overseas before arriving is a nice cushion, however, signing into a year contract without actually seeing the school in person can be a big mistake. There are many TESOL jobs available in Taiwan and different schools suit different people.

Teaching English With A Buxiban

The textbooks we use are all created by the school. There are over 7 different branches in the city we are located in. The school I work at expects a lot of paper work. We are required to prepare homework sheets and tests for the schools. I have learned to be very patient and understanding with students.

The Rewards of Living and Teaching English in Taiwan

I would recommend anyone considering teaching abroad to do it. You can save a lot of money while experiencing a new culture in a new place. It is very rewarding and you can live a very high quality of life. The food, the people, the weather,  and the environment are all aspects of what I absolutely love about Taiwan. There are plenty of jobs available and I would recommend it to anyone who wants to make the move to Taiwan.

Recommended Reading:

TESOL Teacher Review: Teaching English in Kaohsiung, Taiwan

TEFL Taiwan: Traveling

TEFL Taiwan: Finding Accommodation

0 replies

Leave a Reply

Want to join the discussion?
Feel free to contribute!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.