TESOL Mexico: Going it Alone

TESOL jobs mexico applying on your ownEven if you don´t speak Spanish, don´t rule out flying to Mexico and searching for a job by yourself. Without Spanish, getting information about schools may be a little tricky, but once you are through the door, the receptionist and the person who interviews you will almost certainly speak English.

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New Zealand Work Permit

The first thing you should do about the work visa is contact www immigration.govt.nz <http://immigration.govt.nz/>. On this web site, you can find out what sort of visa is available to you, which will depend on the agreement your country has with New Zealand. Many of you will be eligible for a work/ holiday visa for a one year stay. Alternatively, you could apply for jobs at ESL schools and ask them to sponsor a work visa for you.

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TESOL Jobs Mexico: Online Job Search vs Moving to Mexico

Finding the right TESOL job in MexicoTo find the right TESOL job in Mexico you need patience, manners, and good advice. The same goes for the job search. Never lose your temper. You need to develop a reputation as an easygoing person – along with the more obvious traits of diligence and respectability. If your boss and coworkers see that you can accept illogical situations and react with understanding when encountering problems, opportunities will present themselves to you.

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How I Found My First TESOL Job in Spain

Before I went to Spain I started planning. I booked my ticket and a few months in advance I began scouring the internet for TEFL or TESOL jobs in Spain. This search produced a staggering amount of results, so it was very time consuming to weed out the good from the bad.

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Australian Expatriate: Teaching English in Vietnam

Why I Chose to Teach English in Vietnam

By Andrew McGuiness – Teaching English in Vietnam with a 100-hour TESOL Certificate

Teaching English in Vietnam with an OnTESOL TESOL certificateMost people take up teaching English as a way of supporting themselves while they live in a foreign country, and I was no exception. I had finished my PhD thesis and passed the viva and now I had to make some corrections to it – which mainly meant reading three or four books and vamping up the literature review. In Australia, I was working as an underpaid furniture removalist and couldn’t find time to work on my thesis corrections. I expected (and still do) to get a research position, but I knew that the lead time on applications meant it would be nine to 12 months before I was able to take one up. My wife and I were interested in Asia (where it’s possible for a new ESL teacher to get work) and we wanted to give our child the experience of living in a different culture while still young. We decided on Vietnam.

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10 Years Teaching English in New Zealand

Why did I come to New Zealand to teach English? Ten years ago, at home in Colorado, I answered an advert that was for a job in Human Resources. It read “Live and work in an English speaking paradise”, I would never have guessed that ten years later I would be teaching British English and Business English here in New Zealand. My first work visa was for a Human Resource specialist, now I can’t imagine doing anything but teaching. I have been fortunate to work for the same London owned school for ten years. Read more

Why I Chose to Teach English in Spain!

Teaching English in Spain TEFL In my blog series I will write about teaching English in Spain. I hope to provide you with valuable advice on cultural adaptation, job hunting, and teaching.

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TEFL Taiwan: Adaptation

TEFL Taiwan By William Van Luven – Teaching English in Taiwan

TEFL Taiwan AdaptationI came to Taipei, Taiwan, on August 27, 2010. After packing up and leaving home several times in the past decade, to travel and live abroad, I found this particular departure easier to deal with. In the past, this was not the case.

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My TESOL Journey: Teaching English in Mexico

My TESOL Career – ESL Teacher in Mexico

In the summer of 2002, about a month after graduating university and a week after the first ever Bonnaroo music festival in Tennessee, I flew to Korea to teach ESL in an industrial suburb of Seoul. Possessing only about 200 cash and a backpack full of clothes and camping gear, I was fortunate to work for a good school run by an honest, helpful boss – not the case for many in the same circumstance.

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